Quote
"

If it’s warm, and you wanna be outed, I know just the place for you. New York’s hottest club is MARY. Opened in 1997 by missing Florida woman Lisa Martinez, this club is currently going 90 miles an hour down the Westside highway.

This place has everything: charts, graphs, PowerPoints, a guy who still thinks Jamba Juice is good for you. And if you liked Russell Crowe in Les Miserables, you might want to hear Jasper the Gorilla pass a kidney stone. It’s fancy, and there’s even a password: the last words of murdered blues legend, Sweet Willie Walker. It’s “My wallet? Yeah, right!”.

"

— Saturday Night Live (via enjoythefilm)

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pokemon-personalities:

pokemon-personalities:

WHY IS MASUDA RETWEETING A BUNCH OF PICTURES OF POKEMON PLUSHIES WEARING GLASSES

bless this man

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I think my Mom had the glasses on Electrode and I had the glasses on Zorua.

(via alternative-pokemon-art)

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theeconomist:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

theeconomist:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

(via good)

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theonion:

Editorial Cartoon | ‘Casualties Of Bore’

theonion:

Editorial Cartoon | ‘Casualties Of Bore

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Video

Teens React to Weird Al Yankovic

(Source: youtube.com)

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latenightseth:

This week on Late Night!

SO pumped for bigdatabigdata and joywave on Wednesday!
And Paula Pell on Thursday!

latenightseth:

This week on Late Night!

SO pumped for bigdatabigdata and joywave on Wednesday!

And Paula Pell on Thursday!

Link

nytransitmuseum:

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Worker installing Futurama Model, 1939. Courtesy of General Motors

General Motors’ Futurama exhibition, designed by Norman Bel Geddes, was by far the most popular attraction at the 1939 World’s Fair. Even on rainy days there was a long line. Seated visitors moved on a conveyor belt over highly-detailed scale models that created the illusion of looking out an airplane window flying over an imagined American future, circa 1960. According to the 1939 guidebook, the amazingly detailed model contained, “approximately 500,000 individually designed houses; more than a million trees of eighteen species; and 50,000 scale-model automobiles, of which 10,000 are in actual operation.” In this utopian future, gleaming skyscraper cities were connected to vast suburbs, productive farmland and pristine wilderness by a nationwide network of highways. It showcased what GM considered a better world – living in spacious suburban homes, commuting quickly to work in the city, and enjoying vacations in the country.

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Line Outside General Motors Building, 1939. Courtesy of General Motors

General Motors was not just trying to sell cars. They were pitching the idea of a future where the landscape was transformed by the automobile, while advocating government funding for the necessary infrastructure.  After glimpsing the future, visitors viewed the latest models of Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, LaSalle, Oldsmobile and Pontiac for sale.

The exhibition’s visual effects wowed fairgoers. Viewers sat in six-foot tall, high-backed chairs, moving at 102 feet per minute along a 1600 foot conveyor belt and traveling decades into the future over the course of a 15 minute ride. Pre-recorded audio messages guided them along the journey.

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Visitors on Conveyor Viewing the Futurama Model, 1939. Courtesy of General Motors

The designer Normal Bel Geddes imagined that a highway system would bring the country closer together, helping “people of various classes and regions—the workers, the intellectuals, the farmers, business men—get to know each other better and to understand each other’s problems.” Unfortunately, the new suburban communities of the 1950s and 1960s often exposed racial and economic disparities rather than alleviating them.

Seen by 28,000 people per day and a whopping 26 million visitors by the conclusion of the fair, Futurama sparked a post-war dialogue about highway planning that eventually led to the approval of the Federal Highway Act in 1956, bringing about fundamental changes to the American landscape. By the 1964 World’s Fair, the changes were evident: While most 1939 fairgoers arrived by subway and caught a train home for only five cents, by 1964, cars were an indelible part of American life and consumer culture.

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Aerial View of the World’s Fair Marina Parking Lot, 1964. Courtesy of the New York Public Library

To learn more about the evolution of transportation, visit the new Transit Museum exhibition, Traveling in the World of Tomorrow: The Future of Transportation at New York’s World’s Fairs, on view in Grand Central Terminal through November 2nd.

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shirtoid:

Dark Side of the Pizza is available at Naolito
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cthulhukawaii:

That’s me, pretty much :3 - CthulhuKawaii

cthulhukawaii:

That’s me, pretty much :3 - CthulhuKawaii

Tags: Cute Cthulhu